29 Asian Noodle Recipes You'll Want to Slurp Up Immediately

You’ll find about a bajillion (only a slight exaggeration) recipes for pasta on Greatist, but today we’re shifting our noodle love to another continent. From pad Thai to yakisoba to miso ramen, countries such as Thailand, Japan, and China (just to name a few) have given the world some of its most slurp-worthy dishes. As a bonus, most Asian noodle recipes take less time to cook than the Italian varieties, so you win in both the flavor and the prep departments. Noodle around with these 29 recipes—some traditional, some not so much—and you’ll know what we mean.

Soba Noodles


Photo: The Girl on Bloor

Tossed in a dressing made from cumin, chili powder, and of course, lots of cilantro and lime, these bright and zesty noodles have a definite chipotle vibe going. Chicken and plenty of fresh veggies get mixed in too, making this an easy 30-minute meal.


Photo: Baker by Nature

Soba noodles and shrimp both cook fast, so this is a perfect meal to whip up when you’re short on time (a.k.a. every night). Coated lightly in sesame oil and simple ingredients such as garlic and ginger, it’s equally delicious served hot or chilled.


Photo: Rainbow Nourishment

Summery is right. Mixed with spiralized zucchini, fresh corn, nectarines, avocado, and mango, these soba noodles sure know how to celebrate the best of the warm season. They’re also tossed in a dressing that’s just creamy enough without being heavy, making this the perfect refreshing lunch or dinner.


Photo: Feasting at Home

This recipe could easily have been called “50 Shades of Green Noodles,” but thanks to nutritious gems such as edamame, broccoli, snow peas, and asparagus in the mix, “jade” is a more appropriate name—and we aren’t talking about jade eggs. With soy beans and tofu both making an appearance, it’s also a protein-rich but meat-free meal.


Photo: The Healthy Hunter Blog

This single-serving salmon soba bowl (say that five times fast) is just what the doctor ordered on a day you need comfort food that’s not fried chicken and waffles.


Photo: Catching Seeds

Proving that soba works well in any season, this salad features some of fall’s favorite produce alongside the noodles, with a tahini dressing tying everything together. The entire combo makes for a killer way to usher in colder weather.


Photo: Dolly and Oatmeal

Japanese and Mediterranean diets rank high on the nutrition scale, so this recipe, mixing typical ingredients from both cuisines, basically wins at the whole “healthy” thing. Soba noodles are covered in a tahini and herb dressing, then tossed with zucchini, pine nuts, and olives; this is food fusion at its tastiest.


Photo: Organically Mandy

Soba noodles may be delicate, but they hold up well to this light, dairy-free pesto. Spiralized zucchini accompany the strands of buckwheat, so you get a much more noodle-y bang for your buck.

Udon Noodles


Photo: My Korean Kitchen

Get your gut health ­in check in the most delicious way ever with this chewy, spicy, tangy kimchi stir-fry. It’s tasty enough just tossed in the Korean-inspired sauce, but we highly recommend adding that optional soft-boiled egg on top for extra protein… and the extra nom factor.


Photo: The Missing Lokness

Udon noodles in a creamy tomato soup may have you doing a double take, but don’t knock it ’til you try it. Especially since there’s beef and bacon involved.


Photo: Food by Maria

This recipe treats udon more like Italian pasta than Asian noodles, tossing it in a primavera-style mix of veggies, herbs, and nuts. Avocado and prepared pesto lend a creamy contrast, and for a cheesy boost, dairy-free nutritional yeast does the trick.


Photo: Neighbor Food Blog

Combine an Asian-inspired roast with udon, and you have an insanely hearty (and easy) dinner. The meat gets tender over eight hours in the slow cooker, so all you have to do is cook the noodles separately and ladle the fall-off-the-bone beef on top.


Photo: Whisk and Shout

Chilled udon is traditionally eaten with a simple dipping sauce, but this summer-ready salad jazzes it up with some veggies and a creamy, avocado-based dressing. With just five main ingredients, you get a whole new dish that comes with added flavor and fiber.


Photo: Life as a Strawberry

You may expect a Thai curry from the name of this recipe, but the coconut and red curry paste actually form more of a thick sauce than a soup, which works perfectly with the chewy udon noodles. A quick 15 minutes on the stove, and this meal is ready for your face plant.


Photo: The Cook Report

If you’re at a loss for a tasty but quick meal, this 20-minute recipe is your answer. A homemade teriyaki-style sauce keeps the sugar under control for the salmon marinade, while a chopped red chili adds a welcome kick to the dressing that coats the noodles.

Rice Noodles


Photo: Happy and Harried

It may look like a lot of ingredients, but upon closer inspection, you’ll see that it’s really just a lot of the same components getting used multiple times. Plus it’s much easier to make than it appears: ready in just 30 minutes and yielding some pretty dynamite sweet and spicy flavors.


Photo: Vegan Sandra

Rice noodles form the base of this Buddha bowl-like creation and are topped with broccoli, chickpeas, and a dollop of sour cream made from sunflower seeds (yes, really). With veggies, carbs, protein, and healthy fats taken care of, this is a super-tasty way to get in your macronutrients.


Photo: Rhian's Recipes

With tons of fresh veggies, silken tofu, and a sauce made from just a handful of basic Asian ingredients, this no-cook salad is all about clean and simple flavors. That doesn’t mean it’s boring though—from the crunch of the produce to the zesty soy and vinegar dressing, it’s refreshing and totally satisfying.


Photo: Natasha's Kitchen

Sometimes you just need a straightforward stir-fry, and this one delivers in the taste, ease, and health departments. No fancy condiments or prep methods—just a simple, delicious heap of chicken, veggies, and rice noodles.


Photo: Iowa Girl Eats

If actual pot stickers are too much of a pain to make, opt to eat them this deconstructed way. Rice noodles and tamari instead of wonton wrappers and soy sauce means that this recipe is gluten-free, but the ground pork, shredded cabbage, and egg mixture ensures it still tastes exactly like the dumpling filling.


Photo: Delish Knowledge

Doing away with the egg, fish sauce, and shrimp, this pad Thai uses tofu for protein, and plenty of lime juice, chili paste, peanut butter, and soy for seriou flavor. It’s also ready in just 15 minutes, giving you a faster alternative to takeout.


Photo: Minimalist Baker

A Southeast Asian fast food goes meat- and grease-free in this recipe. Singapore noodles are famously doused in oil, but this version uses just two tablespoons, letting the curry powder, garlic, and lime really shine through.

Ramen Noodles


Photo: Lemon Blossoms

You know that crispy fried noodle topping at the salad bar that always makes it onto “don’t eat” lists? Here’s a whole plateful you can wholeheartedly enjoy, since the ramen noodles are baked instead and tossed in an equally crunchy mix of coleslaw mix, almonds, and edamame.


Photo: Cooking Classy

Thai curry can be a tricky dish to replicate at home if you don’t have the authentic ingredients. This recipe does use the packets from the ramen package for some seasoning help, but they’re balanced out with more wholesome items such as light coconut milk, tons of vegetables, and fresh cilantro.


Photo: Baker by Nature

Ramen noodle soup is generally known as being more robust than its soba or udon-based counterparts, but this recipe is extra-flavorful, even by those standards. But while most ramen recipes rely on sodium-rich, heavy pork broths, this one spices things up with ginger, garlic, and a generous squirt of Sriracha.


Photo: Soup Addict

This dish nixes the flavoring packets that usually come with instant ramen, but the homemade sauce is ridiculously easy to put together, requiring nothing more than whisking together a few basic Asian ingredients. Pour it on to a pile of sautéed veggies and throw a scrambled egg in for some protein in the meat-free mix.


Photo: Vanilla and Bean

If you love the chewy texture of ramen noodles but don’t love the often-greasy soups they come in, go for this lighter alternative. With a veggie broth and just enough miso paste to add the all-important savory touch, this recipe lets you have your ramen and eat it too.


Photo: Holy Cow Vegan

Noodles may not be a common sight in Indian cuisine, but maybe they should be, given how well ramen works in this South Asian-style coconut curry. With curry leaves and coriander working their magic, this stew is flavorful and—clocking in at just 20 minutes—fast.


Photo: Divine Healthy Food

Instead of swimming in its typical broth, the ramen here is sautéed with veggies and miso paste for a quick and easy dry noodle dish. The tomato and Brussels sprout combo isn’t something you’ll find on most ramen joint menus, but that’s all the more reason this is a must-make dish.

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